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Frozen Lagoon

Posted by Beth Rowlands on January 10, 2013 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (2)

Lagoon has a low water level because of the drought. The water and the pipe going into the lagoon are frozen and sewage from the house is backing up. The lagoon is located to the north of the house so the lagoon and pipe are exposed to the north wind. Has anyone else ran into this problem? How did you fix it?

Habitual Violator Code Language

Posted by Beth Rowlands on January 9, 2013 at 11:10 AM Comments comments (2)

I'm looking for some language to include in a city code that addresses habitual violators of the refuse, abandoned autos and vegetation height.  Does anyone out there know of a county or city code that has included provisions to address these habitual violators?

Water Softener Update

Posted by Beth Rowlands on October 30, 2012 at 11:35 AM Comments comments (2)

The most recent update on the water softener study being done by the Water Quality Research Foundation with input from NOWRA is posted on the KSFA website.

http://www.ksfa.org/index_files/Water%20Softeners_062712_SepticStudyOverview_NEHA2012.pdf

Here are a couple of things to help you evaluate some of the results:

1. TC stands for Timer Controlled regeneration –the softener regenerates at a given interval no matter how much water is used.

2. DIR stands for demand initiated regeneration – the softener regenerates based on the water hardness and actual water used.

Licensed Wastewater System Designers

Posted by Beth Rowlands on October 30, 2012 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

How many of you license wastewater system designers?  Do you have a design manual?  Do you have them take a test?

Irrigation System and Lateral Fields

Posted by Beth Rowlands on October 30, 2012 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

How many of you have seen sprinkler systems installed in a lateral field?  Do you make the homeowner remove it?  Have any of you seen system failures due to the addition of water over the lateral field?

Lateral Rock

Posted by Beth Rowlands on October 11, 2012 at 6:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Can installers use recycled concrete for lateral rock?

Health Tip: Protect Kids From Mosquito Bites

Posted by Beth Rowlands on September 19, 2012 at 9:15 PM Comments comments (0)

And reduce their risk of West Nile virus

By Diana Kohnle

Friday, September 7, 2012

(HealthDay News) -- Mosquito bites can transmit dangerous germs, such as the bug that causes West Nile virus. That's why bite prevention is so important.

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these preventive suggestions:

•Apply just enough insect repellent to cover your child's skin.

•Use an insect repellent with a DEET concentration of no higher than 30 percent.

•Don't use a combination sunscreen/DEET product because you will need to reapply the product frequently, which could be harmful.

•Don't use insect repellents with DEET on babies under 2 months of age.

•When applying DEET repellants on older infants, don't use the product on cuts or around eyes or mouth. Apply lightly around the ears.

•Accounting for the summer heat, dress your child in long pants and sleeves. Cover baby's infant carrier with a mosquito net.

•Keep children away from areas where mosquitoes gather, such as near standing water.

•Fix any holes in window screens.

•Don't let children play outdoors when mosquitoes are most active -- at dawn, dusk and early evening.

 

HealthDay

 

Copyright (c) 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

How Dog-Savvy Is Your Child?

Posted by Beth Rowlands on September 19, 2012 at 9:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Simple safety tips can prevent nasty bites, expert says

By Robert Preidt

Sunday, September 2, 2012

 

 

SUNDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Dog bites are one of the risks faced by children playing outdoors, but some simple safety measures can help protect them.

"In the summer, dogs are out more, kids are out more, and the more contact that dogs and people have, the more likely it is that somebody will get bitten," Dr. Anne Brayer, a pediatrician in emergency medicine at University of Rochester Medical Center, in New York, and director of Injury Free Coalition for Kids, based at URMC, said in a medical center news release.

Remaining calm and not aggravating a dog are key elements in preventing dog bites. Dogs bite when they feel anxious or threatened. Staying relaxed when dealing with an aggressive dog can help minimize the threat, Brayer said.

She offered the following tips:

•Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog, and keep children away from dogs that are eating, sleeping or caring for puppies.

•Be careful when visiting older relatives with dogs. These dogs often aren't used to young children and can be jealous of the attention they receive.

•Remember that all breeds of dogs can bite, and a dog's upbringing plays a much larger role in its tendency to bite than its breed.

•Do not approach an unfamiliar dog, which may perceive you as a threat and may think you are challenging it.

•Avoid neighborhood dogs with a history of aggression and dogs that have little contact with children.

Adults should always keep an eye on children when dogs are nearby and teach them how to act around dogs, Brayer said. Teaching them to keep their face away from dogs reduces the likelihood that the child will make eye contact with the dog and seem threatening.

If a child is approached by an unfamiliar dog, he or she should "act like a tree or act like a log," Brayer advised. This means remaining motionless, not shouting, and avoiding eye contact.

If knocked to the ground, children should curl up into a ball and protect their face and neck with their hands and arms. This can help minimize injuries.

Children should be taught not to tease a dog. That means not pulling its tail, petting it roughly or taking away its toys. Even doing these things in play can overexcite a dog and lead to an unintentional bite, Brayer said.

About 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children most likely to get a bite are between 5 and 9 years old.

SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Aug. 2, 2012

 

HealthDay

 

Copyright (c) 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Outbreak of Hantavirus Infection in Yosemite National Park

Posted by Beth Rowlands on September 19, 2012 at 9:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Updated: September 17, 2012

Highlights

 

 

As of September 13, the National Park Service (NPS) has announced a total of 9 confirmed cases of hantavirus infection in people who recently visited Yosemite National Park. The visitors to Yosemite are residents of: California (7), Pennsylvania (1), and West Virginia (1).

Three of the confirmed cases were fatal.

 

NPS public health officials believe that 8 of the 9 people with confirmed hantavirus infection were exposed to the virus while staying at the Signature Tent Cabins in Curry Village in Yosemite National Park. The other park visitor with hantavirus infection was probably exposed to the virus while hiking or staying at the High Sierra Camps, located about 15 miles from Curry Village. The park is contacting visitors who stayed in the Signature Tent Cabins from mid-June through the end of August, advising them to seek immediate medical attention if they exhibit symptoms of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS), a rare but serious illness caused by hantavirus.

The park is also providing information about HPS risks and symptoms to visitors who stayed at the High Sierra Camps this summer.

On September 12, the park sent an additional notification on HPS to all overnight visitors to the park.

 

CDC and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) are working with NPS in responding to the situation. The Signature Tent Cabins in Curry Village have been closed.

CDC is supporting the NPS response with testing of patient samples for evidence of hantavirus infection, providing guidance on clinical management of HPS and epidemiologic support for the response, and maintaining a Hantavirus Hotline for public inquiries.

The park is providing educational materials about hantavirus and HPS to all visitors to the park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Information

 

 

 

CDC-INFO (1-800-CDC-INFO) provides information about hantavirus and HPS to callers in the United States.

 

CDC maintains a Hantavirus Hotline (877-232-3322 and 404-639-1510) and information about HPS on the Hantavirus website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At a Glance:

 

 

Case Count: 9

Deaths: 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAQ: U.S. Visitors to Yosemite

 

FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Links

 

 

National Park Service (NPS): Hantavirus in Yosemite

California Department of Public Health (CDPH)

 

 

 

Case Count (State of Residence) Map

 

 

Click map to view updated & previous case count maps.

 

Epi Curve

 

 

Click graph to view updated & previous epi curve graphs.

 

September 13, 2012

 

Case Count Update

 

The National Park Service (NPS) has announced that there are now 9 confirmed cases (including 3 deaths) of hantavirus infection in visitors to Yosemite National Park since June of this year. Eight of the nine individuals with hantavirus infection stayed in Yosemite's Signature Tent Cabins in Curry Village. The ninth person hiked and camped in Tuolumne Meadows and the High Sierra Camps, located about 15 miles from Curry Village.

 

Update: Hantavirus in Yosemite

From the National Park Service (NPS) website.

 

September 6, 2012

 

Case Count Update

 

The National Park Service (NPS) has announced that there are now 8 confirmed cases (including 3 deaths) of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) in visitors to Yosemite National Park. Seven of the people with HPS stayed at Curry Village in Yosemite National Park since June of this year. The eighth person hiked and camped in Tuolumne Meadows and the High Sierra Camps, located about 15 miles from Curry Village.

 

The park is now providing information regarding HPS risks and symptoms to parties who made reservations at the High Sierra Camps this summer.

 

Update: Yosemite National Park Continues Response to Hantavirus Case

From the National Park Service (NPS) website.

 

August 31, 2012

 

CDC Health Advisory

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a national health advisory, Notice to Health Care Providers: Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Cases Associated with Staying in Yosemite National Park, California. The purpose of this this advisory, which was distributed through CDC's Health Alert Network, is to inform state health departments and health care providers to be alert to the possibility of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in patients who may have had recent exposure to rodents or a history of travel to Yosemite National Park during June through August 2012.

 

Notice to Health Care Providers: Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Cases Associated with Staying in Yosemite National Park, California

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

 

August 31, 2012

 

Case Count Update

 

Yosemite National Park announced that it continues to scale up its public health response and outreach as a result of 6 confirmed cases of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in individuals who visited the since June of this year.

 

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Response Continues at Yosemite National Park (August 31, 2012)

From the National Park Service (NPS) website.

 

August 30, 2012

 

Case Count Update

 

The National Park Service (NPS) has announced there are now 6 confirmed cases of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) in visitors who stayed at Curry Village in Yosemite National Park since June of this year.

 

Hantavirus Found in Four More Visitors to Yosemite National Park

From the National Park Service (NPS) website.

 

August 29, 2012

 

Initial CDC Announcement

 

On August 27, 2012, the National Park Service (NPS) announced that there were 3 confirmed cases and 1 probable case of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) in visitors who stayed at Curry Village in Yosemite National Park since June of this year. NPS public health officials believe that these visitors may have been exposed to hantavirus while staying at the Signature Tent Cabins in Curry Village. Two people have died. CDC and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) are working with NPS in responding to the situation.

 

The park is contacting visitors who stayed in the Signature Tent Cabins from mid-June through the end of August, advising them to seek immediate medical attention if they exhibit symptoms of HPS. HPS is a rare but serious disease and confirmed cases should be reported to CDC via state health departments.

 

CDPH and Yosemite National Park public health officials are conducting rodent surveys for the purpose of monitoring the numbers (abundance of) deer mice and hantavirus activity in the park's mouse populations. They are also providing health education and prevention messages to the public.

 

The Yosemite National Park has a non-emergency phone line (209-372-0822) for questions and concerns related to hantavirus in Yosemite National Park. Furthermore, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a hotline number (404-639-1510) and information about HPS on the Hantavirus webpage.

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Contact Us:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Viral Special Pathogens Branch

1600 Clifton Rd

Atlanta, GA 30333

Hantavirus Hotline

(877) 232-3322

(404) 639-1510

800-CDC-INFO

(800-232-4636)

TTY: (888) 232-6348

[email protected]

About VSPB (Viral Special Pathogens Branch)

Page last reviewed: September 17, 2012

 

Health Officials Tracking Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Pet Turtles

Posted by Beth Rowlands on September 19, 2012 at 9:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Despite ban on selling them, 160 people in 30 states have fallen ill

By Robert Preidt

Friday, September 7, 2012

 

 

 

Related MedlinePlus Pages

 

 

Animal Diseases and Your Health

Salmonella Infections

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. and state health officials said Friday that they are investigating six overlapping, multistate outbreaks of human salmonella infections linked to turtles or their environments.

More than 160 illnesses have been reported in 30 states. Of those with salmonella infections, 64 percent are children aged 10 or younger, 27 percent are children aged 1 or younger, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Fifty-six percent are Hispanic.

"Many people don't know that turtles and other reptiles can carry harmful germs that can make people very sick. For this reason, turtles and other reptiles might not be the best pets for your family, especially if there are children 5 years old and younger or people with weakened immune systems living in your home," Casey Barton Behravesh, deputy branch chief in the CDC's Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch, said in a CDC news release.

Contact with reptiles such as turtles, snakes and lizards and with amphibians such as frogs and toads can be a source of human salmonella infections. Salmonella germs are contained in both reptile and amphibian droppings, and can easily contaminate their bodies and the water in their tanks or aquariums.

"Since 1975, it has been illegal in the United States to sell or distribute small turtles with shells that measure less than four inches in length. This ban, enforced by the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration], likely remains the most effective public health action to prevent salmonella infections associated with turtles," Dr. Tom Chiller, deputy branch chief of the Mycotic Diseases Branch at the CDC, said in the news release.

Despite this ban, small turtles continue to cause salmonella infections in people, especially among small children.

The CDC offers the following safety tips:

•Don't buy small turtles from street vendors, websites, pet stores or any other sources.

•Keep reptiles out of homes with young children or people with weakened immune systems. Do not keep reptiles in child care centers, nursery schools or other facilities with young children.

•Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water immediately after touching reptiles or anything in the area where they live and roam. Adults should always supervise hand washing for young children. If soap and water are not readily available, use hand sanitizer.

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Sept. 7, 2012

 

HealthDay

 

Copyright (c) 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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